Texas Digital Library Conference System, TCDL 2013

Font Size: 
DigiCamp
Elizabeth Gushee, Amy Rushing

Last modified: 2013-03-21

Abstract


Do you have a passion for an idea or a topic that you would like to discuss, a concern or a problem that you would like to get solved, a favorite technology tool that you wish to share? Are you reluctant to present or ask questions in a traditional conference setting? If the answer is "yes" to any of these questions, then come join your fellow campers for DigiCamp. DigiCamp, based on the unconference model, is an informal, no-pressure, participant-driven event that seeks to both build community among librarians, archivists, technologists, repository managers, students and scholars as well as provide a forum for spontaneous conversation, the launching of new ideas, and the sowing of seeds for future collaborations. The overarching theme of DigiCamp is digital libraries. A call for discussion topics, tools and project demos will be made a few weeks before Camp, and might touch on areas such as metadata; digital curation; digital archives and special collections, big data; technology-based instruction; digital humanities; intellectual property; or cross-disciplinary skill sets. Those with the most participant-generated interest will prevail, although time will be built in for the unexpected.

DigiCamp is co-organized by Elizabeth Gushee and Amy Rushing. In the spirit of bringing together colleagues who are engaged in library-related digital projects, DigiCamp seeks to bring a new type of programming to the conference. It is hoped that this interactive and informal format will not only provide a forum for capturing casual conversations among colleagues and incorporating them into conference programming, but also provide an additional opportunity for broadening conference participation and engagement among colleagues across the state of Texas. This workshop, planned for 2 hours, will follow the unconference model, where the agenda is not set beforehand, there are no prepared papers presented, the discussion topics and/or activities are decided upon by the participants the day of the gathering, and all participants are encouraged to participate. Successful “Camp” examples that DigiCamp will be modeled upon are THATCamp and CurateCamp.

Unconference agendas are generally created by participants. The co-facilitators will send out a call for topic ideas ahead of time, create a wiki for pre-Camp idea capture, and post "Camp How Tos" for participants so they’ll have an understanding of what to expect. Depending on topics presented by the participants, the co-facilitators may divide the Camp into three genres:

General Discussion: Campers suggest digital library topics of interest to them and discuss

Solvathon: Campers get together to discuss a shared or general problem/challenge

Demoathon: Campers get together to demonstrate a project-in-progress or a favorite technology tool



Keywords


unconference; metadata; repositories; archives; cultural heritage materials